Events Calendar

EVENTS CALENDAR

Tule Lake, Camp South, from the Signal Station, Tule Lake in the Distance
Tule Lake, Camp South, from the Signal Station, Tule Lake in the Distance, from the series The Modoc War, Eadweard Muybridge, photographer; Bradley & Rulofson, publisher, 1873, albumen stereograph, California Historical Society
Thursday, July 28, 2016, 6:00pm
The Modoc War: A History Examined Through Objects in the Exhibition

$5 for CHS Members and Educators, $10 General Admission

Please RSVP: https://modocwar_historytoldthroughobjects.eventbrite.com

Join California Historical Society in an engaging exploration of the history of the Modoc War with a conversation inspired by images and collections seen in CHS' exhibition, Sensational Portrayals of the Modoc War, 1872–73. Authors Boyd Cothran, Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence, and Cheewa James, MODOC: The Tribe That Wouldn't Die, will take us through the background and impetus for the war and provide insights on why this war was monumental, destructive, and historic.

Speakers: Boyd Cothran is Associate Professor of U.S. Indigenous and Cultural History at York University in Toronto, Ontario Canada. Born and raised in Ventura County, California, he has spent the last decade researching California Indian history and the history of the Civil War era. He is the author most recently of Remembering the Modoc War: Redemptive Violence and the Making of American Innocence (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014), which received the Western History Association's 2015 Robert M. Utley Prize for the best book in western military history. He has also written about the history of American Indians and the Civil War for the New York Times and for Indian Country Today. Cheewa James was born on the Klamath Reservation, Oregon, and is enrolled with the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma. Her great-grandfather fought in the 1873 Modoc War. James served as a National Park Service ranger in the Lava Beds National Monument, site of the Modoc War. She has authored several Native books including MODOC: The Tribe That Wouldn't Die (Naturegraph, 2008). She has written for Smithsonian, National Wildlife, and True West, winning a Will Rogers Medallion Award for writing on the West. As a TV news journalist and anchorwoman, she won the National Golden Mike Award for Production in the Interest of Youth. James worked as a consultant for Oregon Public Broadcasting's 2011 “The Modoc War” and appears in the documentary. She is currently a professional motivational speaker.

This event is a part of a series of program dedicated to the history and contemporary lives of the people of the Klamath Reservation and their descendants.

More about the Modoc War (written by Author Cheewa James)

The Modoc War of 1872–73, fought in what is today the Lava Beds National Monument, CA, stands as an amazing conflict in United States history. The Modoc War involved only one relatively small group of American Indian people. However, it is a riveting example of what happened across the United States as non-Indian settlers, landowners, and military personnel persevered in efforts to continue westward expansion.

The Modoc saga is one that is shared by California and Oregon. But the end of the war would see Oklahoma become a part of this poignant story as surviving Modocs involved in the war were sent to Oklahoma Indian Territory as prisoners-of-war.

The Oakland Museum of California

California Historical Society at First Sundays @ OMCA

Saturday, August 7, 2016, 10:00am – 6:00pm
California Historical Society at First Sundays @ OMCA
Summer Reading Celebration: Read, Create, Explore!

Suggested donation: $5 per person. Your contribution helps us provide access to others.

The California Historical Society is back once again for the Oakland Museum of California’s Summer Reading Celebration! Held in OMCA’s lush gardens on First Sunday @ OMCA, activities will highlight this year’s theme, Read, Create, Explore! We will be there drawing and making cameras out of paper, cardboard, and other materials and sharing coloring pages from our collections!

For more information, visit: http://museumca.org/2016/first-sundays-omca-summer-reading-celebration-read-create-explore

Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon
Friday, August 12, 2016, 6:00pm
Just For CHS Members:
Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon with Author Larry Tye

California Historical Society, San Francisco

Free event

RSVP or Join

New York Times bestselling author Larry Tye will discuss Bobby Kennedy's inspired transformation from the cold warrior he was at the start of his career to the hot-blooded liberal he'd become by the end—with a special focus on how he was shaped by his experiences in California. He will be joined by reporter and editor Martin Nolan.

Artist Spotlight – Natalie Ball
Artist Spotlight – Natalie Ball
Thursday, August 18, 2016, 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Artist Spotlight – Natalie Ball

Free Event

RSVP: https://artistspotlight-natalieball.eventbrite.com

Join us on Third Thursdays for a presentation by artist Natalie Ball, who will discuss several of her art projects and take questions from the audience.

Natalie is an indigenous artist who examines internal and external discourses that shape Indian identity through contemporary art. She believes historical discourses of Native Americans have constructed a limited and inconsistent visual archive that currently misrepresents our past experiences and misinforms current expectations. She excavates hidden histories, and dominant narratives to deconstruct them through a theoretical framework of auto-ethnography. Her goal is to move “Indian” outside of governing discourses in order to rebuild a new visual genealogy that refuses to line up with the many constructed existences of Native Americans.

Because auto-ethnography refers to the self, Natalie’s location as a descendent of African slaves, an English U.S. soldier, and a descendant of Kintpaush, also known as Captain Jack who led the Modoc resistance during the Modoc War of 1872, informs her work. It is within this framework that her artistic approach and interest lies. Her work is always in discussion with racial narratives critical to understanding both the self and the nation and necessarily, our shared experiences and histories.

Natalie Ball was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She has a Bachelor’s in Ethnic Studies from the University of Oregon and a Master’s in Maori Visual Arts from Massey University, New Zealand. Natalie currently resides with her three children on the Klamath Tribes’ former reservation.

At 5:00pm and 7:00pm take a docent tour through our exhibitions Native Portraits: Contemporary Tintypes by Ed Drew and Sensationalist Portrayals of the Modoc War, 1872–73. Docent tours last 30–40 minutes.

An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe
Wednesday, August 31, 2016, 7:00pm
An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873

Location: LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes, 501 N. Main Street, Los Angeles, California, 90012

Free event, please RSVP: http://talkingaboutnativecahistory.eventbrite.com

Between 1846 and 1873, California's Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. In An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873 (Yale University Press, 2016) historian Benjamin Madley uncovers the full extent of this slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended. This deeply researched book is a comprehensive and chilling history of an American genocide, as defined by the United Nations Genocide Convention (1948).

Madley describes pre-contact California and precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence against California Indians. He narrates the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Many participated: vigilantes, volunteer state militiamen, U.S. Army soldiers, U.S. congressmen, California governors, and others. The state and federal governments spent at least $1,700,000 on campaigns against California Indians. Besides evaluating government officials culpability, Madley considers why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book."

This event is a part of a series dedicated to the history and contemporary lives of Native Californians, and is presented in conjunction with the exhibitions Native Portraits: Contemporary Tintypes by Ed Drew and Sensationalist Portrayals of the Modoc War, 1872–1873. Learn more about this effort at www.californiahistoricalsociety.org.

This event is presented by the California Historical Society in partnership with LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes and News from Native California. To learn more about LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes, visit http://lapca.org/

About the Author:

Benjamin Madley is assistant professor of history, University of California, Los Angeles. He focuses on Native America, the United States, and genocide in world history. He holds a B.A., M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Yale University and a M.St. from Oxford University.

Book signing to follow the presentation and Q&A.

The Modoc Stronghold after Its Capture, from the series The Modoc War, 1873
The Modoc Stronghold after Its Capture, from the series The Modoc War, 1873
Eadweard Muybridge, photographer
Albumen stereograph
Bradley & Rulofson, publisher
California Historical Society, PC-RM-Stereos_1618.jpg
Wednesday, September 28, 2016, 6:00pm
Modoc War Photographs: How Native Americans Represented National Anxieties about Race, Democracy, and Expansion in Post-Civil War Era

$10 General Admission, $5 CHS Members and Educators

RSVP: https://themodocwar_throughphotography.eventbrite.com

This talk will broadly explore how Native Americans were depicted in nineteenth-century American photography and the function of these photographs as sites of anthropological study, as well as their documentary and illustrational uses. Using the Modoc War photographs as a case study, the talk will also address how photographs of Native Americans represented national anxieties and debates about race, democracy, and expansion in the post-Civil War era.

Makeda Best is an Assistant Professor in Visual Studies at the California College of the Arts. A historian photography, she has a special interest in war photography and has written most recently on contemporary soldier photography and photography and the atomic bomb. Her current book project is on American photography of the Civil War era.

Artist Spotlight – Sarah Biscarra Dilley
Thursday, October 20, 2016, 6:00pm – 7:00pm
Artist Spotlight – Sarah Biscarra Dilley

Free event

RSVP: https://artistspotlight-sarahbiscarradilley.eventbrite.com

Join us on Third Thursdays for a presentation by artist, Sarah Biscarra Dilley. She will discuss several of her art projects, the collective Black Salt Collective, and take questions from the audience.

SARAH BISCARRA DILLEY (chumash + chicana) is a multi-disciplinary artist, bruja, ‘axi. Her work explores the spaces between the worlds; between blood sickness and bloodlines, between grief and joy, between body and land, between the spatial and the temporal. She is anchored in the intention and practices of indigenous resurgence: through cartographic upheaval, through contradiction, through complexity, through communion. Using found footage, cut paper, archival material, handwork, language and thread, she traces a landscape of indigenous resilience and shifting relationships of belonging, displacement, and home. Her work and words have been exhibited nationally and internationally, individually and with Black Salt Collective She is full of birds.

At 5:00pm and 7:00pm take a docent tour through our exhibitions, Native Portraits: Contemporary Tintypes by Ed Drew and Sensationalist Portrayals of the Modoc War, 1872–73. Docent tours last 30–40 minutes.

History, Identity, Photography – Tintype Artists Ed Drew and Will Wilson in Discussion
(Left) Zig Jackson, Citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, Professor of Photography, Savannah College of Art and Design. Photo by William Wilson); (Right) Ed Drew, Plummie, 2014–15, Tintype, courtesy of the artist and Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco
Thursday, November 3, 2016, 6:00pm
History, Identity, Photography – Tintype Artists Ed Drew and Will Wilson in Discussion

$5 for CHS Members, $10 General Admission

RSVP: https://history_identity_photography-discussionbtw2artists.eventbrite.com

Join us for a fascinating discussion between two photographers who use the historic and unique tintype process to create thought-provoking images that challenge historic and contemporary perspectives of Native Americans. Ed Drew, the tintype photographer featured in our exhibition Native Portraits: Contemporary Tintypes by Ed Drew will discuss how he got into the field and the medium and about his project, People of the Klamath. William Wilson, a Diné tintype photographer featured in museums including Portland Art Museum and Denver Art Museum, and galleries and museums all over the South and North West, will discuss how he got into photography and chose the tintype as his medium, and about his project, The Critical Indigenous Photographic Exchange (CIPX).

Ed Drew was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY and joined the military in 1999 two days after his eighteenth birthday. He has served for six years in the active duty Air Force and six years in the California Air National Guard as a Staff Sergeant and helicopter gunner on Combat Search and Rescue helicopters stationed in Moffett Field, near Mountain View, California. He is also a recent graduate of San Francisco Art Institute, where he received a BFA majoring in Sculpture and minoring in Photography. He has worked in many private collections as well as the Nelson Atkins Museum in Missouri. He currently lives in Brooklyn, NY.

William (Will) Wilson is a Diné photographer who spent his formative years living in the Navajo Nation and is currently program head of photography at the Santa Fe Community College. Born in San Francisco in 1969, Wilson studied photography at the University of New Mexico (Dissertation Tracked MFA in Photography, 2002) and Oberlin College (BA, Studio Art and Art History, 1993). In 2007, Wilson won the Native American Fine Art Fellowship from the Eiteljorg Museum and in 2010 was awarded a prestigious grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation. He has held visiting professorships at the Institute of American Indian Arts (1999–2000), Oberlin College (2000–2001), and the University of Arizona (2006–2008). From 2009 to 2011, he managed the National Vision Project, a Ford Foundation-funded initiative at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, and helped to coordinate the New Mexico Arts Temporary Installations Made for the Environment (TIME) program on the Navajo Nation. He is part of the Science and Arts Research Collaborative (SARC), which brings together artists interested in using science and technology in their practice with collaborators from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia Labs as part of the International Symposium on Electronic Arts, 2012 (ISEA). Currently, Wilson’s work can be seen at the Portland Art Museum in Contemporary Native American Photographers and the Edward S. Curtis Legacy, Zig Jackson, Wendy Red Star, and Will Wilson.

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